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Biometric factors and orthokeratology lens parameters can influence the treatment zone diameter on corneal topography in Corneal Refractive Therapy lens wearers

  • Liyuan Sun
    Affiliations
    Institute of Medical Technology, Peking University Health Science Center, Beijing 100044, China

    Department of Ophthalmology & Clinical Center of Optometry, Peking University People’s Hospital, Beijing 100044, China

    College of Optometry, Peking University Health Science Center, Beijing, China

    Eye Disease and Optometry Institute, Peking University People’s Hospital, China

    Beijing Key Laboratory of Diagnosis and Therapy of Retinal and Choroid Diseases, China
    Search for articles by this author
  • Xuewei Li
    Affiliations
    Institute of Medical Technology, Peking University Health Science Center, Beijing 100044, China

    Department of Ophthalmology & Clinical Center of Optometry, Peking University People’s Hospital, Beijing 100044, China

    College of Optometry, Peking University Health Science Center, Beijing, China

    Eye Disease and Optometry Institute, Peking University People’s Hospital, China

    Beijing Key Laboratory of Diagnosis and Therapy of Retinal and Choroid Diseases, China
    Search for articles by this author
  • Heng Zhao
    Affiliations
    Institute of Medical Technology, Peking University Health Science Center, Beijing 100044, China

    Department of Ophthalmology & Clinical Center of Optometry, Peking University People’s Hospital, Beijing 100044, China

    College of Optometry, Peking University Health Science Center, Beijing, China

    Eye Disease and Optometry Institute, Peking University People’s Hospital, China

    Beijing Key Laboratory of Diagnosis and Therapy of Retinal and Choroid Diseases, China
    Search for articles by this author
  • Yan Li
    Affiliations
    Department of Ophthalmology & Clinical Center of Optometry, Peking University People’s Hospital, Beijing 100044, China

    College of Optometry, Peking University Health Science Center, Beijing, China

    Eye Disease and Optometry Institute, Peking University People’s Hospital, China

    Beijing Key Laboratory of Diagnosis and Therapy of Retinal and Choroid Diseases, China
    Search for articles by this author
  • Kai Wang
    Correspondence
    Corresponding authors at: Institute of Medical Technology, Peking University Health Science Center, No. 38 xueyuan Road, Haidian District, Beijing 100044, China.
    Affiliations
    Institute of Medical Technology, Peking University Health Science Center, Beijing 100044, China

    Department of Ophthalmology & Clinical Center of Optometry, Peking University People’s Hospital, Beijing 100044, China

    College of Optometry, Peking University Health Science Center, Beijing, China

    Eye Disease and Optometry Institute, Peking University People’s Hospital, China

    Beijing Key Laboratory of Diagnosis and Therapy of Retinal and Choroid Diseases, China
    Search for articles by this author
  • Jia Qu
    Affiliations
    School of Ophthalmology and Optometry, Eye Hospital, Wenzhou Medical University, China
    Search for articles by this author
  • Mingwei Zhao
    Correspondence
    Corresponding authors at: Institute of Medical Technology, Peking University Health Science Center, No. 38 xueyuan Road, Haidian District, Beijing 100044, China.
    Affiliations
    Institute of Medical Technology, Peking University Health Science Center, Beijing 100044, China

    Department of Ophthalmology & Clinical Center of Optometry, Peking University People’s Hospital, Beijing 100044, China

    College of Optometry, Peking University Health Science Center, Beijing, China

    Eye Disease and Optometry Institute, Peking University People’s Hospital, China

    Beijing Key Laboratory of Diagnosis and Therapy of Retinal and Choroid Diseases, China
    Search for articles by this author
Published:April 29, 2022DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.clae.2022.101700

      Abstract

      Purpose

      To investigate the relationship between patients’ baseline biometric factors or lens parameters and the diameter of the treatment zone in young myopic children undergoing Corneal Refractive Therapy.

      Methods

      The data of patients undergoing Corneal Refractive Therapy lens treatment within two years were retrospectively reviewed. Baseline clinical data, including sex, age, refractive power, corneal topography readings, ocular optical biometric measurements, and Corneal Refractive Therapy lens parameters, were subjected to Pearson, Spearman, and partial correlation analyses to identify the potential factors that may influence treatment zone diameter on corneal topography. Logistic and linear regression analyses were used to predict the treatment zone size.

      Results

      The Right eyes of 309 patients were included in this study. The spherical refraction, flat keratometric reading, Reverse Zone Depth 2, Landing Zone Angle 1, and lens diameter were independent factors of treatment zone diameter. In the multivariate analyses, Landing Zone Angle 1 was positively correlated, while Reverse Zone Depth 2 and lens diameter were negatively correlated with the size of the treatment area. The accuracy of logistic regression in predicting the treatment zone size was 71.5%.

      Conclusion

      Adjustments to Corneal Refractive Therapy lens parameters may influence the treatment zone diameter on corneal topography. A higher Reverse Zone Depth 2, smaller Landing Zone Angle 1, and larger lens diameter can lead to a smaller treatment zone for Corneal Refractive Therapy lens treatment.

      Keywords

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