Authors’ Reply: “Thirty years of ‘quiet eye’ with etafilcon A contact lenses: Additional considerations”

      We welcome the opportunity to respond to the Letter by Dr Carnt and Professor Stapleton concerning our review of the role of etafilcon A in modern contact lens practice [
      • Efron N.
      • Brennan N.A.
      • Chalmers R.L.
      • Jones L.
      • Lau C.
      • Morgan P.B.
      • et al.
      Thirty years of ‘quiet eye’ with etafilcon A contact lenses.
      ]; however, we feel that a number of points they raise are misguided.
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