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SMART Study: Three year outcomes

  • Author Footnotes
    1 Northeastern Illinois University. Chicago: BA Pre Optometry (1977). Illinois College of Optometry: BS Visual Science (1979), Doctor of Optometry (1981). Fellow, Orthokeratology Academy of America (2006). S. Barry Eiden, OD, FAAO, Robert Davis, OD, FAAO - Principal Investigators.
    Robert S. Gerowitz
    Footnotes
    1 Northeastern Illinois University. Chicago: BA Pre Optometry (1977). Illinois College of Optometry: BS Visual Science (1979), Doctor of Optometry (1981). Fellow, Orthokeratology Academy of America (2006). S. Barry Eiden, OD, FAAO, Robert Davis, OD, FAAO - Principal Investigators.
    Affiliations
    Private Practitioner Palatine, Illinois, USA
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  • Author Footnotes
    1 Northeastern Illinois University. Chicago: BA Pre Optometry (1977). Illinois College of Optometry: BS Visual Science (1979), Doctor of Optometry (1981). Fellow, Orthokeratology Academy of America (2006). S. Barry Eiden, OD, FAAO, Robert Davis, OD, FAAO - Principal Investigators.
      Purpose: The SMART study is a four year longitudinal multicenter evaluation of corneal reshaping contact lenses in influencing the progression of myopia in children (age 8 to 14 at enrollment) compared to the wearing of soft silicone hydrogel contact lenses worn on a daily wear basis with monthly replacement. Secondary endpoints evaluate the safety and efficacy of corneal reshaping treatment.
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